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Wildlife encounters

Live life on the wild side and get up close and personal with Queensland’s wildlife.

Whale watching

There's nothing quite like seeing a whale up close with your own eyes. Photo: Queensland Government

There's nothing quite like seeing a whale up close with your own eyes. Photo: Queensland Government

Witness the beauty of these majestic giants during their slow migration along Queensland’s coast from May to late November.

Whale watching tours are conducted in:

Read about new legislation to protect and manage marine mammals in Queensland.

Turtle watching

Share the beach with these amazing marine reptiles. Photo: Queensland Government

Share the beach with these amazing marine reptiles. Photo: Queensland Government

Experience an ancient ritual. The largest concentration of nesting marine turtles on the eastern Australian mainland occurs at Mon Repos.

Join a ranger-led turtle tour at Mon Repos Regional Park near Bundaberg to witness adult turtles laying their eggs on the beach and tiny hatchlings racing to the water’s edge. Tours run between November and March.

Bat viewing

Female bats leave their roost at dusk to feed. Photo: John Ausgusteyn, Queensland Government.

Female bats leave their roost at dusk to feed. Photo: John Ausgusteyn, Queensland Government.

Feel the rush of thousands of tiny bats flashing past you as they leave their roost at dusk. At Mt Etna Caves National Park, QPWS rangers will guide you on an evening tour to Bat Cleft cave to watch this amazing spectacle. The cave is one of only seven recorded little bent-winged bat maternity sites in Australia.

Other parks where you may see bats include:

Birdwatching

How many birds can you spot? Photo: Queensland Government

How many birds can you spot? Photo: Queensland Government

Take the binoculars and experience the serenity of birdwatching in the bush. Many parks are great places to go birdwatching.

In the lush rainforests of Lamington National Park you’ll be captivated by the birds, from brightly coloured parrots and bowerbirds to the fascinating Albert’s lyrebird with its ability to mimic other sounds. Choose a walking track at Binna Burra or Green Mountains and finish your morning of ornithology with a bush breakfast or picnic before heading home.

Other places to go birdwatching in Southern Queensland include:

On the Keppel Bay islands you’ll find many fascinating birds. Look out for birds of prey in the air, terns and cormorants hunting for fish at sea and waders wandering the sands. You’ll also find land birds, such as rainbow bee-eaters and pheasant coucals, who are permanent residents of the islands’ woodlands and heaths.

Other places to go birdwatching in Central Queensland include:

The ever-changing seasonal wetlands of Townsville Town Common Regional Park are perfect for birdwatching. Choose from observation points, bird hides or a stroll along the billabong to view a wide range of woodland and waterbird species.

Other places to go birdwatching in North Queensland include:

Last updated
13 November 2012